Category Archives: Main

Restaurants in Park City

Here are some of our favorite restaurants in each area of Park City:

Historic Main Street Restaurants
With the highest concentration of restaurants and bars in Park City, Main Street offers dining options for every visitor.

350 Main Street Brasserie:($$$)

  • 350 Main offers steaks and seafood to salads and pasta dishes in an elegant, yet casual historic building on Main Street. There is a large dining room upstairs and smaller private rooms downstairs that are ideal for private parties and intimate gatherings.

Chimayo:($$$)

  • Chimayo features southwestern style dishes with an atmosphere that matches its culinary roots. With an eclectic menu featuring interesting specials, Chimayo offers diners a creative option in the spirit of the American Southwest.

Grappa:($$$$)

  • One of Park City’s finest Restaurants, Grappa is worth the uphill climb to its location at the top of Main Street. Grappa’s European influences are apparent in both the wine and food selections. Diners are greeted by an excellent wait staff and will be delighted with Grappa’s authentic old-world atmosphere.

Main Street Pizza Noodle:($$)

  • One of Park City’s best family restaurants, “Pizza Noodle,” has a fun menu of pizza and pasta dishes in a laid back and casual atmosphere. Order at the counter and then sit back and relax while the friendly staff brings your meal to you.

Prime Steakhouse:($$$$)

  • Serving only USDA Prime beef, the Prime Steakhouse is the place to go if you are looking for an excellent steak dinner in a sophisticated environment. With sizzling steaks served from an a la Carte menu, the Prime Steakhouse can not be missed.

Butchers:($$$)

  • Adjacent to the Town Lift Plaza on Lower Main Street, Butchers offers both fine dining and pub-style fare. You can find this excellent establishment in the Caledonian Condo Hotel.

Prospector Square

If you’re looking for someplace with smaller crowds than Main Street (not to mention ample parking), head over to Prospector Square, where you will find some great restaurants.

Blind Dog Cafe:($$$$)

  • A favorite among both Park City locals and visitors, the Blind Dog is two restaurants in one. One side features an excellent menu of steaks, salads and seafood, while the other side is one of Park City’s finest sushi bars.

Nacho Mamma’s:($$)

  • Another local favorite in Prospector Square is Nacho Mamma’s Mexican Restaurant. Step inside for some of their famous salsa and exceptional Mexican dishes. The Hoppin’ Jalapeno Room is a favorite for both kids and adults.

Grub Steak:($$$)

  • Located across the street from the Prospector Lodge and Conference Center is the Grub Steak Restaurant, a veteran establishment that has been serving steaks, seafood and continental fare for nearly 30 years. The salad bar is one of the best anywhere in Utah.
Deer Valley Resort Area

Known for having many of the best on-mountain lodges and restaurants among North American Ski Resorts, Deer Valley is also home to several world-class restaurants with exceptional food and service.

The Glitertind (Stein Erikson’s Lodge):($$$$$)

  • Located in Deer Valley’s Silver Lake area and consistently rated as one of the finest restaurants in Utah, the Glitertind lives up to its prestigious reputation and delivers exceptional fare with world-class service. While dining at the Stein Erikson Lodge may cost a bit more than other area restaurants, it is and experience that will not be soon forgotten.

Goldener Hirsh:($$$$$)

  • Also located in Deer Valley’s Silver Lake area, the Goldener Hirsh Lodge is another top dining destination in the Park City Area. The intimate setting and unique menu featuring nightly specials creates an individual atmosphere that should not be missed if you enjoy fine dining.

The Stew Pot:($$)

  • If you stop in the Deer Valley Plaza in the Snow Park Area, you will find the Stew Pot. The Stew Pot is one of Deer Valley’s best known secrets. Featuring a fantastic lunch menu with homemade soups and stews, this little gem also serves up sensational salads and excellent sandwiches.

Park City Resort Area

While the Base of Park City Resort is only one mile from historic Main Street, don’t miss the excellent selection of dining options nearby.

Baja Cantina:($$)

  • A landmark at Park City Mountain’s Resort Center, Baja Cantina serves as a great lunch stop, an après ski bar and a fine choice for dinner. With multiple varieties of margaritas and a Mexican menu to go with them, Baja Cantina is the place to go in Park City for Mexican food.

The Canyons Resort

Visitors to the Canyons Resort now have more dining options than ever before. From a local pub to fine dining, you don’t need to take a cab anymore if you want to eat out.

The Cabin:($$$$)

  • Located in The Grand Summit Resort Hotel, the Cabin offers excellent food in the comfort and convenience of a world-class condominium hotel.

Smokies Smokehouse:($$)

  • After a day on the slopes at the Canyons, unwind and revel at Smokies, the locals’ choice for a beer and some great bar-style munchies. With a big screen TV, Smokies is the place to watch Sunday football after a day on the snow.

Doc’s:($$$)

  • Located at the base of the Gondola in the Grand Summit Hotel, Doc’s bar provides a slightly more sophisticated atmosphere for an après ski beverage. With delicious appetizers and a well-supplied bar, Doc’s is the place to be seen after a day on the snow.

 

Shopping in Park City

With a huge selection of shops, boutiques and galleries, Park City is a shopper’s paradise. Find whatever satisfies your shopping desires from our list of local merchants.

Art, Art Galleries, Framing Shops

Artworks Gallery:Main Street
Open daily; features fine, contemporary crafts, including jewelry, glass, wood and clay pieces.

Coda Gallery:Main Street
Open Daily. Fine selection of contemporary paintings and sculptures. Art, glass and wood pieces available.

David Whitten Gallery:Main Street
Local Park City photographer featuring images of the Park City area, Utah and the Western United States.

Images of Nature Gallery:
Main Street
World renowned photographer, Thomas Mangelson, offers his famous images as prints, posters, books and postcards.

Iron Horse Gallery:
Prospector
A gallery featuring Lyman Whitaker’s mixed media, paintings, glass, wind sculptures and other unique pieces.

Peak Art and Frame:
Kimball Junction
Custom picture framing services. Also offers ready made frames, prints and photographs.

Scanlan’s Windows of the World:
Main Street
This gallery offers signed and numbered images of the acclaimed world photographers, John and Deb Scanlan.

Bookstores

Dolly’s Bookstore:Main Street
Park City’s landmark local bookstore with cards, music, and gifts.

The Expanding Heart:
Main Street
New age works dedicated to the expansion and transformation of consciousness. Find books, music, jewelry and clothing.

Spotted Frog Bookstore:
Kimball Junction
Stop by and find a great selection of current books and children’s stories. Café located on site.

Clothing/Boutiques

Bunya Bunya:Main Street
Find hot brands and the latest trends at this hip funky boutique.

Canyon Mountain Sports:
The Canyons Resort
Canyon Mountain Sports carries everything you need for outdoor fun in the mountains.

Chloe Lane:
Main Street
Chloe Lane offers three separate stores on Main Street; one for women’s denim, a second for women’s clothing collections and a third store that offers complete collections for men.

Cole Sport:
Park City Resort
Full Service skiwear and equipment for winter and summer outdoor activities. Rental and demo equipment available.

Deer Valley Signature Stores:
Main Street, Deer Valley Resort
Offers a wide variety of authentic Deer Valley logo apparel and gifts. Three separate locations.

Park City Main Street Mall:
Main Street
Find numerous shops with clothing, art, jewelry, furniture and seasonal offerings.

Quicksilver Boardrider’s Club::
Main Street
Official Quicksilver brand gear for skate, surf and snow sports.

Home Furnishings

Elegante:Main Street
Unique home furnishings and gifts. Large pieces such as armoires, beds, dining tables. Custom upholstery, lighting and more available.

Mountain Timber Furnishings:
Kimball Junction
Specializing in large, rustic and mountain furniture. Find home furnishings inspired by the mountains and the outdoors.

San Francisco Design:
Prospector Square
Full service home furnishing specialists. Find classic American and rustic/mountain style home furnishings and accessories.

Jewelers

O.C. Tanner:Main Street
One of Utah’s original jewelers and dealers of precious metals, O.C. Tanner has exclusive custom jewelry as well as fine watches and other items from the world’s premier manufacturers.

Park City Jewelers:
Main Street
Take home a unique piece of jewelry made locally in Utah. Park City Jewelers offer mostly custom pieces designed with the individual in mind.

Tommy Knockers:
Main Street and Kimball Junction
Custom designed jewelry available from one of Park City’s favorite local craftsmen. Handcrafted specialties and other fine gifts available.

Gifts/Antiques

The Art of Wine:Prospector Area
Entertain in style with a large selection of wine, spirits and cigar accessories for the home and office. Wine tasting classes also available.

Christmas On Main Street:
Main Street
Celebrate the holidays year-round with a vast array of ornaments, collectibles, unique Santa’s and other gifts.

Paisley Pomegranate:
Kimball Junction
Find local art, furniture, home accessories, jewelry and gifts for the kids in this locally owned treasure chest.

World Market:
Kimball Junction
World Market finds decorating and entertaining products from around the world. You will also find a large selection of gourmet foods and beverages imported from over 50 countries.

Activities in Park City

Even though the Park City is primarily known as a winter ski destination, with three world class ski resorts, the summer months offer more recreational activities than Winter could ever dream of! Each individual resort will host a wide variety of activities; ranging from hiking and mountain biking to lift/gondola rides and an alpine slide.

 

Biking

Obviously, a mountain resort community like Park City would be a natural setting for a mountain biker’s paradise, which the resort area certainly is with over 150 miles of trails in the area. The beautiful vistas of the Wasatch Mountains are perfect for road biking as well, so don’t miss an opportunity to experience both!

Road Biking

  • Park City is host to another cycling festival in the Summer of 2006!
  • http://www.parkcitycyclingfest.com

Top Road Rideshttp://www.cyclingutah.com

  • Mirror Lake Scenic Byway
  • East Canyon
  • Emigration Canyon Loop
  • Alpine Loop Scenic Byway
  • Provo Canyon Scenic Byway
  • UT-32 Loop – Jordanelle Reservoir to Rockport

Top Mountain Bike Rideshttp://www.utahmountainbiking.com/

  • Rail Trail
  • Sweeney Switchbacks
  • John’s Trail – Park City Mt Resort
  • Spiro Trail – Park City Mt Resort
  • Ridge Ride Trail – Park City to The Canyons
  • Mid-Mountain Trail – Deer Valley Resort
  • Tour de Homes – Deer Valley Resort
  • Tour des Suds – Deer Valley Resort
  • Daly Canyon
  • Round Valley
  • White Pine Canyon
  • Albion Basin

Top Road Rides

  • Cole Sports
  • White Pine Touring
  • Jans

Hiking

The Park City area is home to dozens of beautiful hiking trails for all levels of ability. Each of the three resorts: Park City Mt Resort, Deer Valley Resort and The Canyons, offer lift-serviced hiking in and around their individual trail systems. Park City is also the staging area for numerous hiking trails that access such the lake districts of the Cottonwood Canyons of the Wasatch Front and the high mountain trails of the nearby Uinta Mountains. So whether you’re looking for a quick scenic walk after dinner, a day trip with the family, or a longer more adventurous back-packing trip, Park City is the perfect location to start!

Top Trails/Trailheads

  • Silver Lake Trail – Deer Valley Resort
  • Ontario Canyon Trail – Deer Valley Resort
  • Mid-Mountain Trail – The Canyons
  • Scott’s Pass Trail – Park City Mt Resort
  • Thaynes Canyon Loop
  • Quarry Mountain Trail
  • Silver King Loop
  • Timpanagos Cave – Provo Canyon
  • Kings Peak – Uinta Mountains
  • Uinta Highline

Golf

Golfing in an alpine setting like Park City is a unique experience not to be missed. The State of Utah has one of highest ratios of golf courses per capita in the United States; so there are plenty of tee times available to duffers and low-handicappers alike! The courses surrounding Park City offer a variety of challenges and opportunities, both public and private. Top rated courses, such as the Jack Nicklaus designed Park Meadows Country Club, or some the best public links courses found anywhere; like the Park City Municipal or Mountain Dell. Just visiting? You’ll find beautifully maintained courses, all at 6000 feet elevation, so your ball does indeed fly farther! Staying longer? Join one of the local men’s or women’s leagues and make lots of new golfing friends. Park City’s short golf season is far outweighed by the beauty and grandeur that awaits!

Top Courses

  • Wasatch Mountain State Park
  • Park Meadows Golf Course
  • The Homestead
  • Soldier Hollow
  • Jeremy Ranch
  • Mountain Dell
  • Park City Municipal

Horseback Riding

Park City, Utah is part of the old West, so horses are an integral part of the both the history and the present day life in the area. There are numerous working ranches within minutes of town and many local residents own and board their own horses within Park City’s limits. Horseback riding is a fundamental recreational activity offered by all three ski areas as part of their Summer AND Winter activities programs. In addition, there are several working “dude” ranches in the surrounding areas offering hayrides and sleigh rides, guided trail rides, and outfitted overnight pack trips for private parties.

 

 

Tips on How to Ski Park City in 2018-19

As Park City, and the Wasatch Front in general, continues its ascendancy within the national and international ski culture, the technology, accommodations, and overall experience have become truly world-class. But so have the prices which have consistently crept up over the years—and at a healthy clip. To help combat these rising ski costs, it’s more important and more valuable than ever to do your research on available discounts.

Local residents, including those all along the Wasatch Front, will always have a leg up when it comes to finding the best deals, which often require flexibility and pre-planning. Not to mention the ability to visit the resort several times throughout the season and thus take advantage of season tickets and multi-visit package deals.

Spending the time to do this research and to sniff around for the best options that fit with your ski habit, well, it can feel like a hassle. Nevertheless, it’s usually with the effort. Whether you’re planning to visit Park City Resort, Deer Valley, or some other fabulous ski resort areas in Utah, you can now get a world-class resort experience, while still doing so at a reasonable price.

 

Combine Passes and Resorts

Without a doubt, the corporatization and consolidation of the ski resort industry has led to major changes—many people would argue both good and bad. One of these big changes has been the ability to buy a pass that is good at multiple resorts and even across state lines. A lot of Coloradoans, for example, come to ski at Park City at least once a year, especially now that the Epic Pass allows them to visit Park City Mountain as well. In truth, this pass includes lift access to resorts across the world including Canada, Australia, and throughout the U.S.

 

Online Lift Tickets and Trip Planning Discounts

It’s also true that the gap is narrowing between what local residents and out-of-town skiers need to do to get discounted rates on lift tickets especially, but other trip planning costs as well. Perhaps most significantly, new resources are available to help people find quickly find and access these online discounts. Most skiers have heard of Liftopia, for example, but this far from the only way to get online discounts for your ski trip, including lift tickets. We recommend you check out Utah Ski Edge for help planning your next ski trip to Park City, as well as other Utah ski destinations.

 

New Ski Resources

And these are just a few of the latest developments. There are many resources out there to help you ski more in 2018-19. Do you have your own tip that you’re willing to share with our audience? Do you have concerns or ideas about how to help increase access to Utah skiing in general? Let us know. We’d love to hear them.

 

Good, Safe Fun: The First Snow vs. the First Ski Day

A little more than a couple weeks ago, the benches and much of the Wasatch Front saw between 10-12 inches of snow. This was great for those, like yours truly, who were looking to get out there and start getting into ski shape by dusting off their skis and gliding over backcountry trails. And sure, it gets us all that much more excited for ski season. But it’s not ski season. It’s still shoulder season and without resorts that are open with running lifts, it makes the full ski experience hard to come by. Aside from one broken bone injury, we didn’t hear about any life-threatening accidents yet this year.

And now, as people who live in the mountains know all too well, much of that early season snow is likely to be for naught as a heat wave moves through the area this weekend, bringing 60-degree afternoons here in Park City and 50-degree afternoons in Alta. Along with long-term, seasonal forecasts that seem to predict middle-of-the-road averages, there is definitely an early sense that, for better and for worse, this year could be a volatile one for snow conditions.

Fall Foliage Ratchets Up Expectations for PC Skiing Even Further

As you know, we can’t wait to get started skiing this year. So much so that we couldn’t wait for the actual snow to start falling before heading up to Bald Mountain and getting a view of what the landscape looks like when the fall foliage is still out in full force. Here is a brief selection of photos that we snapped while we were up there. (And for those who aren’t used to visiting this part of Park City during the offseason, or “shoulder season” as it’s called when the lifts aren’t running.)

Preview of the 2018-19 Ski Season in Park City

For the 2018-19 ski season, Park City Mountain (both the main resort and Canyons Village) is scheduled to open on Wednesday, November 21st, 2018 and close for the season on Sunday, April 7th. EPIC Season Passes are already on sale, including EPIC Local and EPIC 4-day passes. The main resort is also advertising a deal where you can get 30% off your lodging costs by booking your stay before November 1st.

 

What’s the Seasonal Weather Forecast for 2018-19?

Last year, the Farmer’s Almanac gave false hope by predicting a wetter than average winter for the Intermountain Region. It didn’t exactly turn out that way though. The forecast for the beginning of the ski season is much the same. The long-range forecast has a snowstorm predicted for Park City for the end of October/beginning of November, but temperatures are also supposed to stay warm generally in October. The overall winter forecast also suggests slightly warmer than average temperatures with normal precipitation levels.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is largely in agreement. While there may be slightly more precipitation in the early winter, it could dry out. The NOAA is also predicting a 70 percent chance of El Nino occurring this year. Their maps for the first half and second half of the ski season that we may struggle to keep our snow around in the lower elevations.

 

Enjoy the Slopes Whenever You Can, The Future is Uncertain

I heard someone speculate that global warming could increase annual snowfall because warmer air masses are able to hold more moisture. Yes, warmer air holds more moisture and this might very well lead to more snow in the highest elevations, but in Park City, too much of this precipitation stands to fall as rain. (It’s also worth pointing out that rain isn’t as good as snow for Utah’s water supply.)

The takeaway for me is to get up into the mountains as soon and as often as I can. And to hope the seasonal weather forecast is wrong for a second year in a row. I know the snow-making machines have gotten a lot better, but they’re still no substitute….Maybe the only thing more cliché than talking about the weather is talking about how much I can’t wait for the ski season to start. But I don’t care! I want the mountains to be covered with snow, and for ski resorts to open, and I know I’m not the only one.

Promotional Rates for the 2018-19 Ski Season are about to Expire

Some of the earliest promotional programs have already expired. Back in May, you could put a $49 down payment toward a discount EPIC pass with the remaining coming due soon as the season is about to begin. Likewise, those who bought daily lift tickets at Park City Mountain Resort in the spring can put these receipts toward a season pass this year. Thus, many people have already purchased their season passes, and you’ll still be able to purchase season passes that deliver unlimited skiing in Park City well into the ski season.

But many of the promotional rates are going to expire in October, so if you haven’t bought your season pass, now is definitely the time. We’re all hoping for a great year of snow, but you can’t wait for the weekly weather forecast and expect to get a decent price on lift tickets. Now is the time to commit to how much skiing you want to do this season.

 

Deer Valley Season Passes

We wanted to start with Deer Valley because there’s a new early deadline date for 2018-19 discount season passes. You have to buy tickets by October 15th this year! By far, the biggest difference comes in the Adult Ticket price which jumps between $300-$400 per person depending on how many adults are in your family. There’s between a $100-$200 jump for most of the other season passes. One notable exception? Military servicemembers can buy their season pass for $1,235 at any time. You can find the entire roster of season passes with both sets of prices (for now) here.

 

Ikon Pass Discount

Owned by Alterra Mountain Company, the Ikon Pass is complimentary with any Adult Deer Valley Season Pass. However, skiers who buy an EPIC Pass for Park City may be interested in buying an Ikon Pass which would allow you to visit Deer Valley a few times a year in addition to scheduling one or more trips to dozens of other destinations that are part of the Ikon Pass resort collective. You can get a $50 discount on the Ikon Pass until October 10th, 2018.

 

Park City Mountain and Epic Pass

Early-bird pricing for EPIC Passes expires on October 7th. Their website simply says that prices will go up. In our experience, this has meant a $50 bump in prices. If you’re looking to travel this year and take advantage of Vail Ski Resorts around the country, you’ll likely be interested in the full EPIC Pass which is currently on sale for $929 per adult and $429 per child (5-12 years). The EPIC Local Pass currently costs $689 for adults 19 and over, $559 for teenagers, and $369 for children (5-12). You can find all EPIC Pass prices and pass details here.

 

What’s the Deal with Park City’s Air Quality?

If you’ve spent any time in Salt Lake City or the rest of Utah’s Wasatch Front, you’re probably familiar with the Salt Lake Valley’s natural inversion and struggle with air pollution. If your exposure to Utah has been mostly weekend and weeklong ski trips and you’ve been fortunate with your timing, you may not know what we’re talking about. That being said, what both local and visitors may or may not be aware of is Park City’s vulnerability to the poor air quality that comes with the Wasatch inversion.

 

Airmass Inversions 101

An inversion occurs when the normal pattern of thermal distribution is reversed—or inverted. In other words, usually when you gain altitude—when you head from the Salt Lake Valley up Parley’s Canyon to Park City, it usually gets colder. This happens when a warm airmass settles over a cooler airmass. Typically, solar rays from the Sun are able to warm the land underneath the colder airmass and disrupt any would-be inversion. In the winter, however, these solar rays aren’t as strong, and if there’s snow cover on the ground, less of the Sun’s thermal energy is absorbed by the ground. An inversion is typically the result and, in some cases, will last until a low-pressure storm system knocks the warmer airmass out of the way.

These inversions are a geological phenomenon and were remarked on by early pioneers who build their campfires and witness the smoke hit a ceiling and spread out horizontally against the sky. For it’s not the thermal inversion that’s the trouble in the end, it’s the trapped dome of air—especially when that dome is habitat to a million people, their cars and their industry.

 

Park City Air Quality for Skiers

Because it’s less common for visible signs of air pollution to manifest in Park City—especially compared to the heavy fog that descend upon the Salt Lake Valley during the worst periods of inversion—it’s easy to think that Park City gets off virtually scot-free. The truth is….a little more polluted than that. Park City can experience its own less intense inversions. Plus, some of the air pollution for Salt Lake City does inevitably leak out and up Parley’s Canyon. And while there are only some 8,500 permanent residents, there are roughly 600,000 yearly visitors, most of them crammed into the few short months that are peak season for skiing—and for inversions.

Now, we typically think of warming temperatures as the primary threat to our beloved ski town, but there’s also a secondary health concern associated with air pollution. While there are few immediate health concerns for the typically youthful skier, those with respiratory issues or those of advanced age or the very young may want to avoid the physical exertion that comes with being on the mountain when the air quality isn’t cooperating. But it’s also no secret that this type of health recommendation is an issue for the ski resorts who are trying to market reliable access to great skiing. That way, they can attract more out-of-town visitors who need to plan their trip in advance of the short-term weather forecast.

Ominously—and this may have changed since we posted this article—but ominously, we haven’t been able to find air quality information for Summit County listed among the state and federal website resources for air quality monitoring:

 

 

Though unsubstantiated, we’ve heard that the ski resorts may be pressuring county and state officials to prevent this information from being readily available to the public. Though problematic in their own right, you may still be able to find certain types of air quality information private weather companies and their websites.

The 2017-2018 Utah Ski Season Gets New Life

The Park City ski season got new life on February 19th, when a good snow storm rolled through the area, followed by sufficiently cold temperatures to keep it there for a while. And while there isn’t a series of blizzards lined up, there are enough flurries and squalls combined with the cold temperatures to ensure decent ski and snowboarding conditions hopefully for at least a few weeks. (I’m already knocking on wood typing this out.)

 

Looking Back

This follows the same pattern as January, which languished in relatively dry and unseasonably warm temperatures until January 20th brought about a foot of snow—rescuing what had been fully deployed snowmaking infrastructure. It’s the temperatures in Park City that are likely to have the biggest part in the story. The mountains seemed to shed the foot of snow with frightening ease at the end of January and early February.

 

The Current Forecast

If we can borrow from the cold snap that’s blanketed much of the eastern United States this year, we might finally have a legit ski season on our poles. Much of the area is hankering to make up for lost time, as most of 2017 was a lost cause for skiing in Park City. And while the average monthly snowfall in Park City doesn’t skew as heavily toward March and April as it does in Colorado, it’s not uncommon for late winter and early spring to see a disproportional amount of the total season’s snowfall amounts.

As bad as the first half of the ski season has been, that doesn’t mean the second half can’t be awesome! On the other hand, just because the end of February has been great for skiing doesn’t mean March is going to be an alpine paradise.

 

Looking Further Ahead

Like any skier, I like to follow both the short-term forecast and long-term climate trends. but I’m not in the business of trying to predict the weather. Still, I have hope, worry, and speculation for the future. The Salt Lake Tribune recently reported, “Resorts at lower elevations, like Park City, Canyons and Deer Valley, could see more rain and 10 percent less snow with even another 1.8-degree rise in temperature.”

It’s not all bad. For one thing, as that same news story points out, people are noticing and recognizing the danger. Plus, warming temperatures should also hold more moisture, mitigating some of the effects. Supposedly. The resorts keep getting better and better at making their own snow. Everything feels almost like it’s in its heyday, where as long as the next snowfall is coming, you can pretend everything is going to be good forever.